Why Do We Need The Hygge Project?

Various studies, from Finland, Denmark, Norway, Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom show evidence of the effectiveness of facilitated peer support for new parents.5 Various specialized peer support groups for new parents exist in the States (e.g. breastfeeding, attachment parenting, baby wearing), but recent evidence suggests this type of narrow group focus can create a barrier to participation for new parents.6 In the U.S., where messages of “self-care” reign, we see a lack of collective support for new parents in all aspects of life. Birthing parents are routinely seen for the first time, by a medical professional, 4 to 6 weeks after giving birth. Further, the U.S. is the only high-income country that offers no federally mandated paid leave for new parents (it’s left to the individual states). This means that up to 25% of new parents return to work within 2 weeks of giving birth — while mothers report the ideal length for leave from paid work is seven months.  The impact of this lack of support is devastating.  One out of three new parents in the U.S. report feeling “isolated,” and one out of five report feeling “unsupported”.1 Ten to forty-five percent of birthing parents report experiencing childbirth and the immediate postpartum period as “traumatic”2 and between ten to twenty percent of birthing individuals in the U.S. will experience postpartum depression.3 Studies report the short and long-term effects of post-traumatic stress in the postpartum period include damage to maternal well-being, relationships with partners, and to the burgeoning relationship between mother and child.4 The Hygge Project brings a wide lens to creating inclusive community support in the U.S. without alignment to a particular parenting philosophy, practice, or experience. The mission of The Hygge Project is to create a cultural shift in the landscape of new parenthood where all new parents can expect more—more support, more comfort, and more connection.

1 (Listening to Mothers III, 2013)

(solaceformothers.org; pattch.org; Greenfield et al. 2016; Beck 2013)

(CDC, Listening to Mothers III 2013)

(Ayers et al. 2006; James 2015).

(Haggman-Laitila and Pietila 2009; Trillingsgaard, Maimburg, and Simonsen 2015; Tveiten, Okland, and Hjalmhult 2017; Haga, Sinning, and Kraft 2012; Dennis 2003; Kruske, Schmied, and O’Hare 2004; Wade and Day 2009)

(Barratt et al. 2018).

0 %

To

1 %

Between 10 to 20% of birthing individuals in the U.S. will experience postpartum depression.

CDC, Listening to Mothers III
0

Out of

1

1 out of 3 new birthing parents in the U.S. report feeling “isolated.”

1 out of 5 report feeling “unsupported.”

CDC, Listening to Mothers III
1 %

to

10 %

10% to 45% of birthing parents report experiencing childbirth and the immediate postpartum period as “traumatic.”

 

solaceformothers.org, 
pattch.org,
Greenfield et al. 2016,
Beck 2013